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The world’s largest army…

A blogger in the US added up the deer license sales in just a handful of American states and arrived at a striking conclusion:

In 2010 there were over 600,000 hunters that hunting season in the state of Wisconsin. Put another way, over the season’s several months, Wisconsin’s hunters became the eighth largest army in the world with more people under arms than in Iran, more than in France and Germany combined.

These men and women deployed to the woods of a single American state to hunt with firearms, and no one was killed.

That number pales in comparison to the 750,000 who hunted the woods of Pennsylvania and Michigan’s 700,000 hunters, all of whom have now returned home.

Toss in a quarter million hunters in West Virginia, and don’t forget the 1,169,667 in Texas, so it literally establishes the fact that the hunters of those five states alone would comprise the largest army in the world.

The point?

America will forever be safe from foreign invasion with that kind of home-grown firepower.

Hunting — it’s not just a way to fill the freezer. It’s a matter of national security.

In Australia, individual ‘skill at arms’ was alive and well until the beginning of the eighties and, with the final nail being driven into the coffin lid in 1996, rifle shooting was a sought after and encouraged skill enjoyed on weekends by thousands of patriotic Australians from within and under the Defence Act.

These proud riflemen formed the core of the two all-volunteer lead elements in the WWI and WWII 1st and 2nd AIF, both of which performed magnificently in battle at the beginning of each war.

Where would we find enough skilled marksmen today?

The Folly of Gun Registration – Part 1

The “folly of gun registration” articles are reprinted here with the kind permission of the author, Derek Bernard, firearms researcher, shooter and businessman based on the Island of Jersey. The opening article is actually the sixth in the series and is the most relevant to Australia. This article originally appeared in Gun Trade World Magazine

Derek Bernard wrote what follows after considering the huge costs and inconveniences of gun-registration systems when used as a form of gun control, as well as the total absence of any corresponding evidence of social benefits resulting from the systems – for example, in reducing gun crime, improving crime resolution, or identifying and convicting criminals.

On the contrary, we have seen how gun registration – in every single country studied – consistently generates the same consequences.

TWO EXAMPLES FROM AUSTRALIA

The 1989 murder of Assistant Commissioner Colin Winchester.

At the time of Assistant Commissioner Colin Winchester’s death he was heavily involved in a complex and long-running investigation into the Mafia controlled production and distribution of cannabis.

On the evening of January 10th 1989, as he was parking his car, he was shot twice in the head at very close range with a .22 Ruger 10/22 rifle.

Police attempted to call in every registered .22 Ruger 10/22 rifle – and succeeded with 60,000 of them – for forensic examination. None of them matched the murder bullets.

The process involved:

  • Extracting details of those 10/22 rifles from a manual card system with millions of entries.
  • Contacting the registered owners to try to confirm current ownership and whereabouts.
  • Arranging for collection and delivery to forensic laboratories. Forensically testing the rifles.
  • Returning the rifles to their owners.

Naturally, all those 10/22 rifles that had never entered the registration system, as well as those for which the record cards were missing or did not contain accurate address details were not examined.

The author has never seen a published police estimate of the total cost of this procedure. His crude estimate is that it would likely have cost an average of at least AUD$300 per rifle; if so, the total cost would have been about AUD$18 million.

The 1989 to 1992 ‘Backpacker’ Murders

Once more, a major focus was applied to the type of rifle used, the Ruger 10/22.

Possibly not trusting the registration system, perhaps through the lack of useful results from the similar Winchester investigation, despite the huge investment of resources that had gone into it, this time the police placed multiple advertisements throughout Australia.

Nothing of use came out of these efforts either. The murderer, Ivan Milat, was eventually identified and convicted in 1996 very largely as a result of the evidence following the realisation that a 1993 report by a young British hitchhiker, Paul Onions, of an attack on him in 1990, might provide vital information.

COSTS AND BENEFITS

We have considered the history of gun registration in New Zealand, the state of Victoria in Australia, New York City, the whole of the US and, most recently, Canada. In Canada we have seen how the Liberal federal government poured more than C$2.7 billion into its long-gun registry between 1995 and 2010 without producing any identifiable benefits of any sort, before the new Conservative government was able to get agreement to close it earlier this year.

We are painfully familiar with the tendency in all governments to regard the taxpayer’s pocket as an inexhaustible ‘magic money tree’ with which to feed egos, distribute largesse to their favourite groups and pursue irrational fantasies. But familiarity should not breed sad resignation – we should never abandon demanding evidence of real benefits arising from government expenditure.

Previously we looked in some detail at the 1961 murder of housewife Juliet Rowe by Keith Rose in Devon, England, using a Colt ‘Woodsman’ .22 pistol. It was rather a grim illustration of how the very existence of a huge database of gun-registration numbers, collected for more than 60 years – at considerable cost and inconvenience to honest gun owners – led police to consume additional, huge resources in a fruitless, nationwide search for all registered Cold ‘Woodsman’ .22 pistols in every police force in the British Isles.

That process would have consumed hundreds of hours, and all without producing any useful information of any sort – only a further vast quantity of useless data, which probably helped to cloud those lines of investigation that might have been fertile. Rose had passed through the hands of the police in 1981 but, perhaps because police resources were stretched by considering the data from all over the UK on registered pistols, he received little attention.

He was only caught eight years later through the alertness of the victim’s husband and a fingerprint he had left at the scene of the crime. The media often give the impression that the vast quantity of police resource sometimes allocated to the resolution of high-profile crimes is, in and of itself, deserving of congratulation. I suggest that that perception is unsound. I suggest that it is the successful application of skill and judgement in selecting those lines of inquiry that actually lead to the solution of the crime, that warrant society’s thanks and compliments.

Police resources are expensive and finite. Repeatedly consuming large amounts of such resources on lines of inquiry, such as exploring firearm-registration databases, which has a long history of negligible worthwhile results, qualifies for Einstein’s definition of insanity: “Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.”

But Britain and Canada are far from alone in their record of sustained waste in this area. It is the norm, while the courage shown by New Zealand and Canada in belatedly ending most of the waste is very rare. Indeed for many years and unholy alliance of dictatorships and ‘big government’ countries at the UN who broadly share a belief that only Big Brother should have guns, not private citizens and have been trying to conclude an Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) that would require every country to waste even larger amounts of resource on registration procedures….

“Three things are necessary for a firearms registration system to be effective.

      • All guns must be registered
      • Criminals must use registered guns
      • Registration must be kept in order and up to date

None of these three criteria appear to be the case in Australia, or elsewhere” Ted Drane, past National President of the SSAA, 1994

 

Click here to read The Folly of Gun Registration – Part 2

This article originally appeared in the Gun Trade World Magazine

 

Canada to pass Common Sense Firearms Licencing Act

This article appeared on www.energeticcity.ca website on the 3rd of June 2015. https://energeticcity.ca/article/news/2015/06/02/zimmer-supports-passing-of-common-sense-firearms-licensing-act-in-house

Zimmer supports passing of Common Sense Firearms Licencing Act in House

Described as a Bill that will enhance safe and sensible firearms policies, the Common Sense Firearms Licensing Act is set to become law in Canada. Energetic City reports that the Bill will see safety training for potential first-time firearm owners, a streamlined licensing system and the removal of the requirement to carry a separate document when transporting firearms to activities such as target practice or a shooting range competition. Co-chair of the All-Party Outdoor caucus Bob Zimmer welcomed the passing of the Bill, saying it was “one step closer to bringing common sense to our firearms licensing regime”. The Bill will now move to the Senate as part of the legislative process.


Prince George-Peace River MP, and Co-Chair of the All-Party Outdoor caucus Bob Zimmer welcomed the passing of Bill C-42 on Friday, the Common Sense Firearms Licensing Act through a third reading in the House of Commons.

The Bill was introduced in the House in October of last year which was geared towards enhancing safe and sensible firearms policies. Specifically the Bill calls for safety training for potential first time owners, a streamlined licensing system, and no longer being required to carry a separate document to transport firearms to activities such as target practice or a shooting range competition.

In a release Zimmer is quoted as saying, “Our government remains committed to supporting law-abiding firearms owners, while also protecting the safety of Canadians. With the passage of Bill C-42 in the House we are one step closer to bringing common sense to our firearms licensing regime.”

Zimmer continued by saying, “These amendments continue our balanced approach to firearms, one that is helping us protect the safety of Canadians, while at the same time reducing the administrative burden for law abiding hunters, farmers, or sport shooters.

The bill will now move to the Senate as part of the legislative process.

Chase Charney chase@moosefm.ca

Canada: Firearm homicides down by 25%

Statistics Canada have released figures for the first full year after the abolition of the longarms registry.  Quite predictably, the murder rate has dropped by 8% and the rate of firearm homicide has decreased by 25%.

Nevertheless, the Canadian anti-gun lobby and symapathetic politicians are still pushing to have the totally useless and financially irresponsible registry reinstated.  This is further proof that evidence is constantly being ignored when formulating policy.

Australia has already invested over $1Bn in taxpayer funds implementing and maintaining a very similar registry that has never once contributed to public safety outcomes or been used to solve a crime.  This is nothing more than a waste of taxpayer funds that could have been spent in other areas. Anti-gun activists often use the term ‘public health’ when spewing their vitriol against law abiding gun owners.  If they were really concerned about public health, they would support the scrapping of the registries and redirecting those funds into the health system.

More details on Canada’s experience can be read at the below link.

https://www.edmontonsun.com/2014/12/02/civil-gun-owners-no-threat